Interview: Brooklyn Designer David Yun On A Post-Post Truth World And Streetwear Brand

Misinformation campaigns by Russia toward western countries; journalists jailed in Turkey; the spread of hoax news in 2016; the Trump administration’s ongoing game to blame the press for Trump’s woes. These kinds of events are causing the creative class in places such as Brooklyn, Berlin and Portland to appreciate the free and independent press.

Brooklyn designers David Yun, Zak Klauck and their team at Wax Studios came up with “an evolving streetwear/advocacy initiative” called Post-Post Truth. “We are deeply concerned about the future of journalism in the US and worldwide,” they write. “How do you fight disinformation in an age when all information is suspect — if facts are tailored to your own personal perspective and reason is seen as suspect?”

To help support a robust, independent media landscape with high ethical standards, the PPT project has pledged to donate 50 percent of profits from their product sales to independent, nonprofit news organizations that support non-partisan investigative journalism. They point to ProPublicaPew Research CenterThe Center for Public IntegrityReveal News and The Associated Press as some of the good guys they want to support. “Post-Post-Truth looks toward a new era when public discourse and debate is framed by observed, corroborated, and reported facts; when the loudest person in the room is one who upholds journalistic standards, crafts arguments with process-based research and employs objective reason,” they write.

Read more on forbes.com

Featured Image Credit: Scott Haven / http://postposttruth.us

 

Surviving in a Post-Truth World

LOS ANGELES – Despite the falsehoods that some politicians peddle, facts still matter, and getting those facts right is essential for survival. I know, because I regularly see the deadly consequences of getting facts wrong.

I am a behavioral ecologist, and I study how animals assess and manage predation risk. But, rather than study the flashy predators – with their sharp teeth, stealthy approaches, and impressive sprinting abilities – I focus on their food.

Some wallabies make bad use of facts. Too often, these four-legged snacks ignore information right in front of them – like rustling in the underbrush or the scent of a passing carnivore. And they pay for this ignorance dearly, with the sudden slash of talons, or the constricting squeeze of a powerful jaw.

But my research has shown that many would-be meals – marmots, birds, lizards, fish, and sessile marine invertebrates among them – are better at assessing risk. In 1979, the ecologists Richard Dawkins and John Krebs proposed the “life-dinner principle,” which holds that prey, with more to lose than predators, are more creative survivalists. The risk of being eaten – and thus removed from the gene pool – provides a strong incentive to up one’s game. For the predator, the only consequence of failure is going hungry until the next meal.

Continue reading on Project-Syndicate.org

Featured Image Credit

Does survival depend on having the facts?

How we got here: The origins of post-truth anti-environmentalism

“I grew up in the Long Island suburbs of New York and have vivid memories of running behind the “fog trucks”. These trucks went through the neighbourhoods spraying DDT for mosquito control until it was banned in 1972.

I didn’t know it until much later, but that experience, and exposure, was extended due to the pesticide industry’s lies and tactics – what is now labelled “post-truth”.

Rachel Carson published Silent Spring in 1962. It was a beautifully written, if distressing, bit of what we today call “research translation”. The “silent spring” was the impact of DDT as songbird species were killed off.

Carson tried to expose the chemical industry’s disinformation. For doing so, she was roundly and untruthfully attacked as a communist and an opponent of progress. Silent Spring was one of the most popular and vetted overviews of environmental science of all time. Yet lies and bullshit prevented a decent policy response for a decade.

And the lies won’t go away. In 2007, one of the think-tanks responsible for climate science misinformation, the Competitive Enterprise Institute, began reiterating one of the main refuted claims about Carson. She was said to be responsible for millions of deaths due to the ban on DDT to control mosquitoes that spread malaria.

The reality is that while DDT was banned for agriculture in the US – and spraying on kids in suburban neighbourhoods – it was never banned for anti-malarial use. Even now. But the political right and the dirtiest chemical industry players in all of industrial capitalism have long painted environmentalists as killers – of people, progress and jobs.

Read more on Business Insider

Featured Image taken as a screen grab from Silent Spring

Will the Lies Continue?

Post-Truth Winners & Screening Details!

In 2016, Oxford Dictionaries selected “post-truth” as the international word of the year, after the contentious “Brexit” referendum and an equally divisive U.S. presidential election caused usage of the adjective to skyrocket.

In response to our new post-truth political landscape, Open Signal and Lower Boom invited local mediamakers to submit proposals for original work on the theme of post-truth, which would be funded with $1,000 stipends.

A jury selected five projects by regional artists to award, granting stipends to Tabitha Nikolai, Dawn Jones Redstone & Brenan Dwyer, Garima Thakur, Carl Diehl and Niema Lightseed.

In addition to being featured on Post-Truth-World.com and Open Signal’s cable channels, the finished pieces will be presented at a screening on Friday, Nov. 3.

Selected works:

“I Am an Alien,” by Garima Thakur, a hypertext non-linear web-based project that plays with the language used on immigration Visa forms like the I-99 and DS-160, which describes an immigrant’s status as an “alien allowed to work”.

“Crop,” by Niema Lightseed, a multimedia exploration of trans-temporal slavery via poetry and video that raises awareness of modern slavery.

“Nemesis,” by Dawn Jones Redstone & Brenan Dwyer, a short comedy film investigating white male fragility through a single Scrabble match.

“Ineffable Glossolalia,” by Tabitha Nikolai, a virtual environment exploring a historical Nazi book burning, and the clumsy and painful efforts to restore the sense of self-lost there.

“The Connective Unconscious,” by Carl Diehl, an interactive electronic art installation that dramatically enacts the construction of online “truths.”

Image Credit: Still from Garima Thakur’s “I Am an Alien.”

RSVP for the POST-TRUTH screening

 

Lana Del Rey suddenly sounds like the poet laureate of post-truth

“Everybody says this new Lana Del Rey album is the one where she finally makes contact with reality from inside her perfumed dream silo, but I think it’s the other way around. With our government making each day of 2017 feel less believable than the one that came before, American reality — or the dismantling of it — seems to be merging with the singer’s vision.

Reality is fragile. If we intend to share it with one another, we have an obligation to protect it. And that’s one big lesson that art is always teaching us: The more familiar we become with what reality isn’t, the better we understand what it is. So we self-educate on the other side — through novels, through movies, through surfing our own theta waves, and now, through Lana Del Rey songs. “Is it the end of America?” she wonders on her record, asking the most burning question in the republic from deep within a dream.

Which is all to say that this new album, “Lust for Life ,” feels like a 21st-century Watusi down the yellow brick road — a gratifying pivot from the old stuff, which only ever made Del Rey sound as if she was dream-journaling on Xanax.”

Read Full Article on Washingtonpost.com

Photo credit

Are You a Fan of Lana Del Rey’s New Message?

PUSHING THE EDGE: What’s the truth about the ‘post truth’ era

Consider this fictional encounter between a mother and her teenage son.

Mom: “Hey Billy. I just received a call from your English teacher. She says you have not been doing your homework in preparation for class.”

Billy: “Don’t listen to her. That’s ‘fake news’. Who are you going to believe that loser teacher or your loving son?”

Who should Mom believe?

Is “fake news” really fake?

Recently we have added new words to our lexicon such as “fake news” and “alternative facts”. The proliferation of social media such as Twitter and Facebook allows erroneous claims to spread really fast. These erroneous claims can easily be interpreted as “truth” when the information confirms one’s preexisting beliefs. This phenomenon is called “confirmation bias”. Given that bias, fake news instigators thrive on stoking their followers’ confirmatory bias.

Confirmation Bias

In today’s highly politically charged environment, there are many “camps of opinion” that hold their beliefs to be right and others, with different beliefs, to be wrong. The “camps” are preoccupied with building arguments using selective “facts” to support their assertion of “truth” and that “prove” the other wrong. When people with opposing views interpret information in a biased way, their views can move even further apart. Many of us are so attached to our beliefs that those beliefs can survive logical challenges.

Read more here: http://norwell.wickedlocal.com/news/20170720/pushing-edge-whats-truth-about-post-truth-era

Featured photo credit: http://ow.ly/j0I430dOEtd

Do you agree: Can beliefs be so strong that they can survive logical challenges?

‘Post-truth is an intellectual label for bulls**t’ – Nish Kumar on The Mash Report

We are living in a ‘post-truth’ era of fake news, we keep being told. British and American politics are becoming more and more like a South Park episode in real life. Enter stand-up comedian Nish Kumar and master satirists The Daily Mash. Written in the week of broadcast, The Mash Report is a new TV show from the minds behind the website whose Onion-style take on the British news cycle has won it 600,000 fans on Facebook and millions of daily readers. Joined by comedic talents Ellie Taylor, Steve N Allen and Rachel Parris, presenter Kumar will report on everything that happened – or didn’t happen – that week.

Read more: https://inews.co.uk/essentials/culture/television/nish-kumar-the-mash-report-post-truth-satire/

Photo credit: Nish Kumar fronts the new topical show The Mash Report (Photo: BBC)

What’s your opinion?